Category Archives: media

The Real Gardeners’ World

As the new series of Gardeners’ World takes dumbing down to new heights, the most alarming casualty of the rush for ratings is the world around us.  By John Walker. Published in Organic Garden & Home, June 2009. Tempting though … Continue reading

Posted in carbon footprint, climate- & earth-friendly gardening, eco gardening, energy use, environment, food miles, garden centres & gardening industry, media, nature & the natural world, organic gardening, overconsumption, published articles, rainwater harvesting, tv gardening & celebrities, water & 'water footprints' | 1 Comment

How Many Apples?

Becoming ‘food secure’ and curtailing climate change by growing our own makes a great sound bite, but where is the evidence to back it up? By John Walker. Published in Organic Garden & Home, March 2009. An apple a day … Continue reading

Posted in allotments, carbon emissions, carbon footprint, climate change & global warming, climate- & earth-friendly gardening, food & kitchen gardening, food miles, fossil fuels, mail order, media, organic gardening, peak oil, pesticides in the garden, published articles, resilience | Leave a comment

We Shop, Planet Drops

Prudent use of natural resources is at the core of gardening organically, so why is the nation’s head gardener urging us to shop? By John Walker. Published in Organic Garden & Home, January 2009. It’s time to grab your wallets … Continue reading

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Hearts and Trowels

Is mismatched leadership and a lack of joined-up campaigning hindering attempts to rouse the nation’s gardeners to grow ultra-local, organic and truly sustainable food? By John Walker. Published in Organic Gardening, November 2008. Despite my lousy maths, I’ve been doing … Continue reading

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Celebrities… Get Them Out of Here

It’s time for programme-makers to ditch celebrities, and instead start creating TV shows around folk who garden in the real world. By John Walker. Published in Organic Gardening, September 2008. Eavesdropping can be a depressing business – as I found … Continue reading

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Time For Climate Questions?

I join the audience for a Gardeners’ Question Time recording to pop questions to our top gardening ‘experts’ about carbon footprints, but did I get any answers? By John Walker. Published in Organic Gardening, July 2008. Inspiration is a powerful … Continue reading

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Smoke and Mirrors

Earth-friendly organic gardening has had a drubbing recently in other gardening magazines. What drives the ‘organic bashers’ – a lack of understanding, or the need to keep the chemical companies sweet? By John Walker. Published in Organic Gardening, June 2008. … Continue reading

Posted in carbon emissions, carbon footprint, climate- & earth-friendly gardening, eco gardening, environment, ethics, garden centres & gardening industry, glyphosate, greenwash, media, organic gardening, pesticides in the garden, politics, published articles, tv gardening & celebrities | 1 Comment

A Royal Shade of Green?

In an exclusive interview for Organic Gardening, I talk recycling, renewable energy and carbon footprints with Bob Sweet, the key decision-maker behind the Royal Horticultural Society flower shows, including the 2008 Chelsea Flower Show. By John Walker. Published in Organic … Continue reading

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Relative Merits

As organic gardeners, we need to challenge attempts to use the growing criticism of organic farming to tarnish our impeccable credentials.  By John Walker. Published in Organic Gardening, May 2007. Organic gardening has a problem, and it’s called organic farming. … Continue reading

Posted in climate- & earth-friendly gardening, energy use, environment, food & kitchen gardening, food miles, fossil fuels, green gardening, media, nature & the natural world, organic gardening, packaging, pesticides in the garden, plastic, published articles | Leave a comment

Dear President…

In an open letter to the president of the Royal Horticultural Society, I ask if 2007 will be the year that Britain’s leading gardening organisation finally wakes up to the realities of global warming. By John Walker. Published in Organic … Continue reading

Posted in carbon emissions, carbon footprint, climate change & global warming, climate- & earth-friendly gardening, eco gardening, ecological footprints, ecological sustainability, energy use, environment, food miles, fossil fuels, garden compost & composting, gardening footprint, green gardening, greenwash, media, organic gardening, overconsumption, packaging, pollution, published articles | Leave a comment