Category Archives: climate- & earth-friendly gardening

Find Out About Garden Food Growing With Frodsham Transition Initiative on Saturday 8th September 2012

On Saturday 8th September 2012, I’ll be offering advice and ideas on how to grow more food in your garden as part of Frodsham Transition Initiative’s free ‘drop-in’ event which is being held at Frodsham Community Centre, from 1-5pm. This … Continue reading

Posted in allotments, blog, climate- & earth-friendly gardening, eco gardening, ecological sustainability, food & kitchen gardening, food miles, transition | Leave a comment

Keep Calm and… Put Up a Greenhouse

It’s time to take cover: after another grey, sodden summer, the future for serious garden food growers looks a lot brighter under glass or plastic. By John Walker. Published on the Hartley Botanic website, 26th July 2012 Pale, drawn and … Continue reading

Posted in climate- & earth-friendly gardening, ecological sustainability, energy use, environment, ethics, food & kitchen gardening, food miles, garden compost & composting, organic gardening, peat & peat-free compost, published articles, rainwater harvesting, renewable gardening, vegan-organic gardening | 1 Comment

It’s Time To Have Your Peat-Free Say On ‘Towards Sustainable Growing Media’

The chair of the government’s Sustainable Growing Media Task Force (SGMTF), Dr Alan Knight, has now published his chair’s report and draft ‘road map’, Towards Sustainable Growing Media. You might well be wondering why we actually need a map, when a … Continue reading

Posted in blog, climate- & earth-friendly gardening, ecological sustainability, environment, ethics, garden centres & gardening industry, garden compost & composting, media, nature & the natural world, organic gardening, peat & peat-free compost, renewable gardening | 2 Comments

Farewell Peat

We should salute peat’s service to gardening, but we no longer need it to grow a beautiful, productive plot. Let’s bid peat adieu and gets its greener successors under our fingernails. By John Walker. Published in Guardian Weekend, 16th June … Continue reading

Posted in carbon emissions, carbon footprint, climate- & earth-friendly gardening, eco gardening, environment, garden compost, green gardening, organic gardening, peat & peat-free compost, published articles | Leave a comment

Greening Up Your Gardening

Rethinking the way you tend your garden will reap great environmental benefits and help to strengthen your relationship with the natural world. By John Walker. Published in Kew magazine, Summer 2012. When it comes to more eco-friendly living, insulating your … Continue reading

Posted in carbon emissions, carbon footprint, climate change & global warming, climate- & earth-friendly gardening, eco gardening, ecological footprints, ecological sustainability, energy use, environment, food miles, fossil fuels, garden centres & gardening industry, garden compost & composting, green gardening, greenwash, nature & the natural world, organic gardening, overconsumption, peat & peat-free compost, pesticides in the garden, published articles, rainwater harvesting, renewable gardening, soil | Leave a comment

Austerity Gardening

Make do and mend, learn to do without, pull your socks up and get stuck in: it’s time to cultivate some old-fashioned values in the garden. By John Walker. Published on the Hartley Botanic website, 15th May 2012. Have you … Continue reading

Posted in carbon emissions, carbon footprint, climate change & global warming, climate- & earth-friendly gardening, ecological footprints, energy use, environment, food & kitchen gardening, fossil fuels, garden centres & gardening industry, gardening footprint, glyphosate, mail order, media, nature & the natural world, organic gardening, overconsumption, packaging, published articles, renewable gardening, resilience | Leave a comment

Time to Turn Off The Tap

With hosepipe bans now in place in many areas, gardeners everywhere need to start tapping into a more joined-up kind of gardening. By John Walker. Published on the Hartley Botanic website, 16th April 2012. Greenhouse gardeners are especially adept at … Continue reading

Posted in carbon footprint, climate change & global warming, climate- & earth-friendly gardening, container gardening, energy use, environment, garden centres & gardening industry, greenwash, media, politics, published articles, rainwater harvesting, renewable gardening, water & 'water footprints' | Leave a comment

Choosing and Using Peat-Free Compost

Are you looking for a dependable peat-free compost that gives consistently good results? In this article published in The Organic Way (205, Spring 2012), I reflect on some lessons learned from my initial trials with 16 different peat-free composts, and … Continue reading

Posted in climate- & earth-friendly gardening, garden compost & composting, organic gardening, peat & peat-free compost, published articles | 1 Comment

Forget FITs – Roll Out Some Gardening GITs!

High-tech sunshine harvesting is all very well if you can afford it, but there’s an easier and more earth-friendly way to turn sunlight into energy that’s right outside your back door. By John Walker. Published on the Hartley Botanic website, … Continue reading

Posted in allotments, carbon emissions, carbon footprint, climate change & global warming, climate- & earth-friendly gardening, ecological footprints, energy use, environment, food & kitchen gardening, food miles, fossil fuels, gardening footprint, green gardening, organic gardening, packaging, peak oil, published articles, renewable gardening, resilience, transition | Leave a comment

Go Green – Hug a Greenhouse

In a garden near you there’s a greenhouse looking for love – and giving it a new home would make your ‘gardening footprint’ a few sizes smaller. By John Walker. Published on the Hartley Botanic website, 23rd January 2012. “Will you stop peeping?” … Continue reading

Posted in climate- & earth-friendly gardening, ecological footprints, energy use, freegardening, gardening footprint, green gardening, organic gardening, published articles, recycling, renewable gardening | Leave a comment