Category Archives: greenwash

Modified New World

Letting the GM genie out of its biotech bottle hasn’t just changed day-to-day life on our allotments, it’s itching to take over control of life itself. By John Walker. Published on the Hartley Botanic website, 15th February 2012. They’ll be … Continue reading

Posted in allotments, eco gardening, environment, ethics, food & kitchen gardening, genetically modified (GM) crops, glyphosate, green gardening, greenwash, media, nature & the natural world, organic gardening, pesticides in the garden, published articles | Leave a comment

Peat-free Compost on Trial: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Inspired (if that’s the right word) by dodgy and persistent claims that all ‘peat-free compost is rubbish’, I’ve set out to find out for myself. Since spring 2011 I’ve been putting around 20 different makes of peat-free compost through their … Continue reading

Posted in blog, garden compost & composting, greenwash, peat & peat-free compost, published articles | 5 Comments

Considerate Cultivation: Running Your Garden on Truly Renewable Fuels

Going peat-free is all-important in an earth-friendly garden, but there’s more: the compost you use needs to be a truly renewable fuel. By John Walker. Published on the Hartley Botanic website, 21st October 2011. Coaxing a steep, bracken-riddled bank of acidic, nutrient-poor … Continue reading

Posted in climate change & global warming, climate- & earth-friendly gardening, ecological sustainability, environment, garden compost & composting, gardening footprint, green gardening, greenwash, nature & the natural world, organic gardening, peat & peat-free compost, published articles, renewable gardening | 2 Comments

Compost Crisis

Climate-friendly peat-free composts aren’t taking their place at the heart of more eco-savvy gardening because we’re not yet paying enough for them. By John Walker. Published in Kitchen Garden, November 2010. When well-known gardening pundits start proclaiming just how ‘awful’ … Continue reading

Posted in carbon emissions, carbon footprint, climate change & global warming, climate- & earth-friendly gardening, eco gardening, ecological sustainability, food & kitchen gardening, fossil fuels, garden centres & gardening industry, greenwash, media, nature & the natural world, organic gardening, peat & peat-free compost, published articles | 1 Comment

Drought of Good Sense

Are gardeners really the ‘victims’ when hosepipe bans are announced – or are we just the unwitting pawns of a gardening industry running dry on ecological consciousness? By John Walker. Published in Kitchen Garden, September 2010. Victimised, threatened and dealt … Continue reading

Posted in climate change & global warming, climate- & earth-friendly gardening, container gardening, ecological sustainability, energy use, environment, food & kitchen gardening, garden centres & gardening industry, garden compost & composting, greenwash, organic gardening, published articles, rainwater harvesting, soil, water & 'water footprints' | Leave a comment

The Peat Delusion

As gardening spin urges us to keep buying peat compost, science is telling us that the safest place for peat is in the ground. By John Walker. Published in Kitchen Garden, June 2010. “If you are concerned about green issues, … Continue reading

Posted in carbon emissions, climate change & global warming, climate- & earth-friendly gardening, environment, ethics, fossil fuels, garden centres & gardening industry, garden compost & composting, greenwash, nature & the natural world, organic gardening, peat & peat-free compost, published articles | Leave a comment

Strange Bedfellows

Garden Organic’s plans to be co-opted by big business threated to undermine the ecologically desirable tenets of thrift, frugality and prudence that organic gardening actually epitomizes. By John Walker. Published in Kitchen Garden, March 2010. Without knowing quite where it’s … Continue reading

Posted in carbon emissions, climate change & global warming, climate- & earth-friendly gardening, eco gardening, ecological sustainability, garden centres & gardening industry, greenwash, media, organic gardening, overconsumption, published articles, retail monoculture | Leave a comment

No Purchase Necessary

Everyone’s green nowadays is a wishful myth taking root in the gardening industry, but there’s only one kind of gardening that’s truly in tune with our planet’s limited resources. By John Walker. Published in Kitchen Garden, January 2010. Am I … Continue reading

Posted in climate change & global warming, climate- & earth-friendly gardening, eco gardening, energy use, environment, food & kitchen gardening, fossil fuels, garden centres & gardening industry, greenwash, nature & the natural world, organic gardening, overconsumption, published articles, retail monoculture, tv gardening & celebrities | Leave a comment

We Shop, Planet Drops

Prudent use of natural resources is at the core of gardening organically, so why is the nation’s head gardener urging us to shop? By John Walker. Published in Organic Garden & Home, January 2009. It’s time to grab your wallets … Continue reading

Posted in carbon emissions, carbon footprint, climate change & global warming, ecological footprints, energy use, environment, ethics, food & kitchen gardening, food miles, fossil fuels, garden centres & gardening industry, gardening footprint, glyphosate, greenwash, media, organic gardening, overconsumption, pollution, published articles, tv gardening & celebrities | Leave a comment

Dead Zone

The environmental case for banishing bedding plants from our gardens has never been stronger. It’s high time we ditched these resource-guzzling, horticultural misfits. By John Walker. Published in Organic Garden & Home, December 2008. If you’re a lover of the … Continue reading

Posted in carbon emissions, carbon footprint, climate- & earth-friendly gardening, container gardening, ecological sustainability, energy use, environment, garden centres & gardening industry, greenwash, mail order, nature & the natural world, organic gardening, packaging, published articles, water & 'water footprints' | Leave a comment